ECIS - European Cancer Information System

Data explorer

 

Share on social media

Or copy the following link

 

Select the country/registry for the analysis
Select the sex for the analysis
Select the cancer site for the analysis
Select the age for the analysis
Select the year for the analysis
Select the indicator for the analysis

Read more about how to interpret the estimates.

Age-specific {measure}

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates observed in each age group, by registry, for selected cancer sites (individually or grouped), and in a specific time interval (individual years or grouped). The age specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).sAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+). per 100,000 person/years in each age group are reported separately for males, females, or both sexes together.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Group/ungroup sexes
Group/ungroup cancers
Group/ungroup years
Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  Apply  

{measure} trends by age

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the time trends in incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates by ageAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+). over a specific time period, separately in each age group (and possibly sex) for selected cancer site(s). Each chart line corresponds to the age specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).sAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+). in the selected time period.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Group/ungroup sexes
Group/ungroup cancers
Change the span of ages grouping
* Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  CLOSE  

{measure} trends by period

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This chart reports overall incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. measures (number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s or standardised rateThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population.sThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures.s) over a selected time period, enabling visualisation by sex and/or cancer site. The standardised rateThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population.sThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. can be computed using the World Standard Population, the old European Standard Population, or the new European Standard Population.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Group/ungroup sexes
Group/ungroup cancers
Modify the displayed statistic
* Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  CLOSE  

{measure} trends by cohort - #placeholder#

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The analysis of time trends of incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. considers three major factors: age of the subject at time of diagnosis or death (age), year the subject was born (birth/cohort), and year in which the subject was diagnosed or died (period).

By year of birth

The age-specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).s are plotted against the years of birth - in intervals of five years - and stratified by age – in groups of 5 years. Each line describes the incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. rates of each age group by year of birth.

By year of diagnosis

The age-specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).s are plotted against the years of diagnosis/death - in intervals of five years - and stratified by age – in groups of 5 years. Each line expresses the trend (increase or decrease) of incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference./mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rate in each 5 year age group by 5 year of time.

By age of diagnosis

The age-specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).s are plotted against the age group of diagnosis - in intervals of five years - and stratified by year of birth – in groups of 5 years. Each line expresses the trend (increase or decrease) of incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. rate in each 5 year period of birth (cohort) by 5 year age groups.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Modify the chart type
  CLOSE  

{measure} by year - summary

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table presents data on cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. for the selected registry by year, in the selected time period. The visualised statistic are: number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s and age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. (Word standard population, old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population), and cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures..

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

{measure} by cancer

 

HOW TO READ THIS TYPE OF CHART

This chart plots data on incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. by cancer site for the selected registry, sex, and time period. Several statistics can be displayed: numbers of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s, age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. (Word standard population, old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population), cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures.s. The cancer sites are ordered by decreasing value of the visualised statistic; if both incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. are selected, the sorting is done for incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference..

Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

{measure} by cancer - summary

 

HOW TO READ THIS TYPE OF TABLE

The table presents data on cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. for the selected registry by cancer site. The visualised statistics are: number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s and age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. (Word standard population, old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population), and cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures..

Age-specific {measure} by cancer

 

HOW TO READ THIS TYPE OF table

The table presents data on cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. for the selected registry by cancer site. The visualised statistics are: number of cases or deaths, age-specific rateAn age-specific rate is the incidence or mortality rate for a specified age group, in which the numerator and denominator refer to the same age group; it is expressed as the number of new cancer cases or deaths per 100,000 population at risk. Five-year age categories are normally used (highest group 85+).s for the 5-year age groups selected by the user.

{measure} by registry

 

HOW TO READ THIS TYPE OF CHART

This chart plots data of incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. by registry for the selected cancer site, sex, and time period. Several statistics can be displayed: numbers of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.ss, age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. (Word standard population, old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population), cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures.s. The registries are ordered by decreasing value of the visualised statistic; if both incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. are selected, the sorting is done for incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference..

Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

{measure} by registry - summary

 

HOW TO READ THIS TYPE OF TABLE

The table presents data on cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. for the selected cancer site by registry. The visualised statistics are: number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s and age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population. (Word standard population, old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population), and cumulative riskCumulative incidence/mortality is the probability or risk of individuals getting/dying from the disease over a specified age-span. Cumulative risk is expressed as the number of cases/deaths per 1000 person-years that are expected to occur in a given population between the specified age limits (e.g. between birth and the age 84 years) if the cancer rates were as those observed in the specified time period in the absence of competing causes. Like the age-standardised rate, cumulative risk permits comparing between populations of different age structures..

Estimated {measure} by country

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This map shows data on estimated incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates by country/region for the selected cancer site and sex. The colours of the map refer to the categories of incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference./mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. measures, defined as the quintiles of the corresponding distribution. The displayed statistics are age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised with old and new European Standard Population, and the Word standard population.

Select the statistic you want to visualise from the corresponding icon enabling the choice of chart/table parameters.

Switching from the map to chart or table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

The map, the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Modify the displayed statistic
Modify the displayed countries
Show or hide the different methods of estimation calculation
  CLOSE  

Estimated {measure} by country - comparison with {Estimates_relative}

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

For a selected cancer site and sex, this chart plots the relative changeThe relative change compares two age-standardised rates (ASR): the rate of the selected country with the rate of the selected reference (Europe or EU28). The formula is (ASRcountry-ASRreference)/ ASRreference.
For example, a relative change of +5% indicates that the country rate is 5% higher than the selected reference rate. Similarly, a relative change of -10% indicates that the country rate is 10% lower than the selected reference rate.
, by country/region, of estimated incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference./mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates as compared to European or EU28 values. The statistics used are age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised using the old and new European Standard Population, and the Word Standard Population.

The chart/table parameters' button allows the selection of the statistic and of the reference population for the comparison.

Countries are ordered by decreasing value of the relative changeThe relative change compares two age-standardised rates (ASR): the rate of the selected country with the rate of the selected reference (Europe or EU28). The formula is (ASRcountry-ASRreference)/ ASRreference.
For example, a relative change of +5% indicates that the country rate is 5% higher than the selected reference rate. Similarly, a relative change of -10% indicates that the country rate is 10% lower than the selected reference rate.
for the selected statistic.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

European regions are defined as following:

  • CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE: Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Ukraine
  • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
  • SOUTHERN EUROPE: Albania, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Italy, FYR Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain
  • WESTERN EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland
Modify the displayed statistic
Modify the reference country
Modify the displayed countries
  CLOSE  

Estimated {measure} by country - summary

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table presents data on estimated cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. by country/region, for the selected cancer site and sex. The displayed statistics are number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s, and age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised with old and new European Standard Population and the Word standard population.

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

European regions are defined as following:

  • CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE: Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Ukraine
  • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom
  • SOUTHERN EUROPE: Albania, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Italy, FYR Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain
  • WESTERN EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland
Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

Estimated {measure} by cancer

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This chart plots data on estimated incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and/or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates by cancer site for the selected country/region and sex. The statistics displayed are age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised with old and new European Standard Population, and the Word Standard Population.

The chart/table parameters' button allows the selection of the statistic and of the reference population for the comparison.

The cancer sites are ordered by decreasing value of the statistic displayed; if both incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. and mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. are selected, the sorting is according to incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference..

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

Estimated {measure} by cancer - percentage distribution

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This chart reports the percentage distribution of cancers for the selected country/region and sex. Each slice of the pie is proportional to the contribution of each cancer on the total in the selected country/region and sex.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Estimated {measure} by cancer - comparison with {Estimates_relative}

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

For a selected country/region and sex, this chart plots the relative changeThe relative change compares two age-standardised rates (ASR): the rate of the selected country with the rate of the selected reference (Europe or EU28). The formula is (ASRcountry-ASRreference)/ ASRreference.
For example, a relative change of +5% indicates that the country rate is 5% higher than the selected reference rate. Similarly, a relative change of -10% indicates that the country rate is 10% lower than the selected reference rate.
, by cancer site, of estimated incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference./mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. rates as compared to European or EU28 values. The statistics displayed are age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised with old and new European Standard Population, and the Word Standard Population.

The chart/table parameters' button allows the selection of the statistic and of the reference population for the comparison.

Cancer sites are ordered by decreasing value of the relative changeThe relative change compares two age-standardised rates (ASR): the rate of the selected country with the rate of the selected reference (Europe or EU28). The formula is (ASRcountry-ASRreference)/ ASRreference.
For example, a relative change of +5% indicates that the country rate is 5% higher than the selected reference rate. Similarly, a relative change of -10% indicates that the country rate is 10% lower than the selected reference rate.
for the selected statistic.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Modify the displayed statistic
Modify the reference country
  CLOSE  

Estimated {measure} by cancer - summary

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table presents data on estimated cancer incidenceIncidence is the number of new cases arising in a given period in a specified population. This information is collected routinely by cancer registries. It can be expressed as an absolute number of cases per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year (see age-specific rate and rate above). The rate provides an approximation of the average risk of developing a cancer in a population for the time period of reference. or mortalityMortality is the number of deaths occurring in a given period in a specified population. It can be expressed as an absolute number of deaths per year or as a rate per 100,000 persons per year. by cancer site, for the selected country/region and sex. The displayed statistics are number of cases or deaths, crudeThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk. rateThe crude rate is the ratio of the number of new cases or deaths in a specified population and time period to the size of the population at risk during the same time period. Incidence and mortality rate are usually presented as an annual rate per 100,000 persons at risk.s, and age-adjusted ratesThe ASR is a weighted mean of the age-specific rates where the weights are taken from the population distribution of a standard population; the ASR is expressed per 100,000. Comparison of rates referring to different time periods or different geographical areas is only possible after considering the differences in the age structure of the underlying populations. The age-standardisation allows the comparison of the rates that are arithmetically adjusted to have the same age structure of the standard population. The standard population used in the ECIS are the following old European Standard Population, new European Standard Population, and World Standard Population., standardised with old and new European Standard Population and the Word Standard Population.

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

Age specific {measure} for all paediatric ages

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

Group/ungroup years
Group/ungroup cancers
Group/ungroup years
* Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  CLOSE  

{statistic} for all paediatric ages and relative percentages

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

Percentages of cancer {measure} for all paediatric ages

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

{statistic} by cancer for all paediatric ages and relative percentages

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

Population pyramid

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This chart plots data from the population for the country selected by sex. The population refers to the last available year for this country. In countries where a national registry is not available, the data on population are obtained by averaging the populations of the areas (registries) currently contributing to the ENCR-JRC project and included in this analysis.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Population by year

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This table plots data from the population for the country selected by sex. The population refers to the last available year for this country. In countries where a national registry is not available, the data on population are obtained by averaging the populations of the areas (registries) currently contributing to the ENCR-JRC project and included in this analysis.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Population by registry

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

This table plots data from the population for the country selected by sex. The population refers to the last available year for this country. In countries where a national registry is not available, the data on population are obtained by averaging the populations of the areas (registries) currently contributing to the ENCR-JRC project and included in this analysis.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Age-specific 5-year {survival_statistic} survival

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the five-year observed survival and relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. (%) for adult (15 years and over) patients diagnosed in years 2000-2007 with the selected cancer in the selected country or European area. The vertical axis reports 5-year survival figures (expressed in percentage) and the horizontal axis reports the age at diagnosis. Each line reported in the chart represents one country and one cancer site.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Group/ungroup sexes
Modify the displayed statistic
Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  CLOSE  

Age-specific and age-standardised {survival_statistic} survival by follow-up interval

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the age-specific and age-standardised observed survival and relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at different follow-up intervals for adult (15 years and over) patients diagnosed in years 2000-2007 with the selected cancer in the selected countries or European areas. European average figures are population-weighted averages of the country-specific relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates. The vertical axis reports relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. (expressed in percentage) and the horizontal axis reports the follow-up intervals. Each line reported in the chart represents a specific age group/cancer site/country.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Group/ungroup sexes
Group/ungroup ages
Modify the displayed statistic
Grouping of specific filters is allowed only on multiple selection
  CLOSE  

Age-specific and age-standardised observed (obs) and relative (rel) survival - summary

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table shows the number of adult (15 years and over) patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 with the selected cancer in the selected country and the observed survival and relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at one, three, and five years after diagnosis. The number of cases and the survival are expressed by age groups at diagnosis, and for all adult ages together. The observed survival and relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates for all adults are age-standardised. Age standardisation is made with the direct method using cancer-specific weightings obtained from the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS).

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

5-year relative survival by cancer and related 95% confidence interval

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at five years after diagnosis for adult (15 years and over) patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 with the selected cancer by country. Each blue bar corresponds to the survival estimate of each European country, while orange and orange bordered bars refer respectively to Europe as a whole and to the European areas: Northern Europe, UK and Ireland, Central Europe, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe. Relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. for Europe is computed as the weighted average of country-specific survival estimates. All relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates refer to all adult ages and they are age-standardised. Age standardisation is made with the direct method using cancer-specific weightings obtained from the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The survival estimate of all sites, but non-melanoma skin cancer, is also cancer site case-mix standardised.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

Country-weighted observed (obs) and relative (rel) survival (%) by age at diagnosis (years)

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table reports the number of adult patients (15 years and over) diagnosed in 2000-2007 with the selected cancer, and the age-standardised relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at one and five years after diagnosis by European country and area (Northern Europe, UK and Ireland, Central Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Europe as a whole). Relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. for Europe is computed as the weighted average of country-specific survival estimates. The relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates refer to all adult ages and they are age-standardised. Age standardisation is made with the direct method using cancer-specific weightings obtained from the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The survival estimates of all sites but non-melanoma skin cancer are also cancer site case-mix standardised.

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

Age-standardised 5-year {survival_statistic} survival by country

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS CHART

The chart shows the relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at five years after diagnosis for adult (15 years and over) patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 with the selected cancer by country. Each blue bar corresponds to the survival estimate of each European country, while orange and orange bordered bars refer respectively to Europe as a whole and to the European areas: Northern Europe, UK and Ireland, Central Europe, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe. Relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age usingtthe International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. for Europe is computed as the weighted average of country-specific survival estimates. All relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates refer to all adult ages and they are age-standardised. Age standardisation is made with the direct method using cancer-specific weightings obtained from the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The survival estimate of all sites, but non-melanoma skin cancer, is also cancer site case-mix standardised.

Switching from chart to table format is enabled by pressing the corresponding button on the top right of the chart/table.

Both the chart and the table can be exported in pdf or excel format, respectively.

European regions are defined as following:

  • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden
  • UK AND IRELAND: Ireland; UK, England; UK, Northern Ireland; UK, Scotland; UK, Wales
  • CENTRAL EUROPE: Austria; Belgium; France; Germany; Switzerland; The Netherlands
  • SOUTHERN EUROPE: Croatia, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain
  • EASTERN EUROPE: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia
Modify the displayed statistic
  CLOSE  

Age-standardised relative survival by country and follow-up interval

 

HOW TO READ AND USE THIS TABLE

The table reports the number of adult patients (15 years and over) diagnosed in 2000-2007 with the selected cancer, and the age-standardised relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. at one and five years after diagnosis by European country and area (Northern Europe, UK and Ireland, Central Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Europe as a whole). Relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. for Europe is computed as the weighted average of country-specific survival estimates. The relative survivalThe relative survival is a standard indicator for comparing cancer survival in population-based studies when the underlying cause of death in unknown. Relative survival is the ratio of the observed survival of patients to the expected survival in a comparable group in the general population for the same region, age, sex and calendar year. It can be interpreted as the survival probability of cancer patients in the absence of other causes of death, which can vary widely between countries. In the EUROCARE-5 study the expected survival was estimated by the Ederer II method from the lifetables of all causes mortality by age, sex, cancer registry and calendar year. Relative survival of patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008 was estimated using the classic cohort approach. Relative survival was standardised by age using the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The mean European relative survival was estimated by weighting country-specific relative survival by the country population. estimates refer to all adult ages and they are age-standardised. Age standardisation is made with the direct method using cancer-specific weightings obtained from the International Cancer Survival Standards (ICSS). The survival estimates of all sites but non-melanoma skin cancer are also cancer site case-mix standardised.

The table can be ordered by each column, and it can be exported in excel format.

European regions are defined as following:

  • NORTHERN EUROPE: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden
  • UK AND IRELAND: Ireland; UK, England; UK, Northern Ireland; UK, Scotland; UK, Wales
  • CENTRAL EUROPE: Austria; Belgium; France; Germany; Switzerland; The Netherlands
  • SOUTHERN EUROPE: Croatia, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain
  • EASTERN EUROPE: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia